American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

(Amanita muscaria var. guessowii)

Conservation Status
American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric
 
  IUCN Red List

not listed

 
  NatureServe

not listed

 
  Minnesota

not listed

 
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
 
Description
 
 

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric is a large, conspicuous, yellow variety of one of the most recognizable mushrooms in the world. It is widespread in North America, common in northeastern United States, and not uncommon in Minnesota. It occurs in coniferous, deciduous, or mixed woodlands, woodland edges, and among planted trees. It is found from June to November, solitary, scattered, in groups, or in fairy rings, on the ground under pine, spruce, fir, aspen, or birch trees. It is mycorrhizal, obtaining its nutrients from the rootlets of a tree while facilitating greater absorption of nutrients from the soil by the tree.

When it first appears the fruiting body is egg-shaped, completely enclosed in a protective membrane (universal veil). As the mushroom expands the universal veil breaks, forming 2 to 4 concentric rings of scales at the base of the stalk. Another protective membrane (partial veil) extends from the margin of the cap to the stalk and covers the gills. At maturity, the partial veil breaks away leaving a persistent ring or collar of tissue at the middle or near the top of the stalk. The ring is fragile, whitish, often with a yellowish edge, and sometimes the edges appear torn or toothed.

The cap on young mushrooms is nearly round at first, becoming convex then ultimately nearly flat at maturity. The mature cap is is 2 to 12 in diameter, sometimes larger. The upper surface is hairless, slimy when moist, pale yellow, bright yellow, or orangish-yellow, often with a reddish-orange or yellowish-orange center. Occasionally, the cap is entirely orange. It is densely covered at first with cottony, wart-like fragments of the universal veil. As the mushroom ages, the warts are worn away or washed away by rain.

The stalk is 2 to 8 tall, sometimes taller, and to 13 16 thick, sometimes thicker. It may be tapered from the base or have an expanded, bulb-like base up to 2 in diameter. It is usually scaly below the ring.

The gills are white, broad, and closely spaced. They are narrowly attached or not attached to the stalk.

The spore print is white.

The flesh is white. It is poisonous. It does not change color when cut.

Most guidebooks and authorities state that American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric is poisonous, and it is true that about 90% of mushroom-related fatalities involve Amanitas. Fly agaric contains the hallucinogenic compounds muscimole and ibotenic acid. They may have been involved in prehistoric rituals. It is poisonous in large, possibly even in moderate amounts, but not normally fatal.

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
  Frost’s Amanita (Amanita frostiana) is smaller, no more than 4 in diameter and usually 3 in diameter or less. The stem does not have concentric rings of scales near the base.  
     
 
Habitat and Hosts
 
 

Solitary, scattered, in groups, or in fairy rings. Coniferous, deciduous, or mixed woodlands, woodland edges, and planted trees. On the ground under pine, spruce, fir, aspen, or birch.

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

June to November

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

4, 7, 24, 29, 30, 77.

 
  9/12/2021      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Widespread in North America. Common in northeastern United States.

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
  Kingdom Fungi (fungi)  
  Subkingdom Dikarya  
  Division Basidiomycota (club fungi)  
  Subdivision Agaricomycotina (jelly fungi, yeasts, and mushrooms)  
  Class Agaricomycetes (mushroom-forming fungi)  
  Subclass Agaricomycetidae  
  Order Agaricales (common gilled mushrooms and allies)  
  Suborder Pluteineae  
  Family Amanitaceae (Amanita mushrooms and allies)  
  Tribe Amaniteae  
  Genus Amanita (Amanita mushrooms)  
  Subgenus Amanita  
  Section Amanita  
  Species Amanita muscaria (fly agaric)  
       
 

Some authorities, including RogersMushrooms.com and the usually reliable Mushrooms Demystified by David Arora, list this as Amanita muscaria var. formosa. However, that name refers to a European variety that does not occur in North America. The North American var. guessowii was first described in 1933.

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

 

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

American Yellow Fly Agaric

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Mycorrhizal

A symbiotic, usually beneficial relationship between a fungus and the tiny rootlets of a plant, usually a tree.

 

Partial veil

A protective covering over the gills or pores of a developing mushroom. At maturity it disappears, collapses into a ring around the stem, or wears away into a cobwebby covering and ring zone.

 

Universal veil

An egg-like structure that envelopes all or most of a developing gill mushroom. Remnants of the universal veil sometimes visible on a mature mushroom are patchy warts on the cap, a ring on the stem, and a volva at the base of the stem.

 
 
Visitor Photos
 
           
 

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Rebekka Erdman

 
 

Some are dinner plate size here!!

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Sheri Karras

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Luciearl

 
 

So many amanitas this fall! I've seen many clusters in the woods.

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Melissa Schlickenmayer

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

PattiOD

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Rachel B.

 
 

found a bunch of these was hoping they were edible but wasn't sure so didn't eat.

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
 

Jeffrey M. Arsenault

 
 

Just after a rainfall, so I believe that the “warts” were partially washed away.

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
 

Corey Bol

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Carrie Olson

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Anne Nienaber

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Walter Rudd

 
 

Here are some nice specimens of the Eastern yellow/orange fly agaric mushroom I found growing in the northern part of Washington county, MN near Scandia. There were hundreds of colonies on this private 14 acre plot of land.

  American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
 

Robert Briggs

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
 

Fairy ring

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
           
 

Young mushroom

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
 

Mature mushroom

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
 

Cap

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
 

Cap with warts mostly washed away by rain

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
           
 

Stem

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric   American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric  
           
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
           
 

Gills

 
    American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric      
           

 

Camera

     
 
Slideshows
 
Amanita muscaria var. formosa (guessowii)
"Teh Internet Tubes"
   
 
About

Uploaded on Apr 1, 2009

Adirondacks, NY, August, 2008.

 
     

 

slideshow

       
 
Visitor Videos
 
       
 

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Melissa Schlickenmayer

 
  American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric 01
Sep 27, 2020
 
   
 
About

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric (Amanita muscaria var. guessowii)
Sartell, Minnesota
9/23/2020
Video by Melissa Schlickenmayer

   
       
 
Other Videos
 
  Amanita Muscaria Var.Guessowii
Jason Parent
 
   
 
About

Published on Sep 26, 2013

This video was uploaded from an Android phone.

   
  Amanita muscaria var.formosa
MyGeorgiaFungi
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Oct 21, 2008

Found a bunch of this beautiful mushroom growing under some pine needles

   
  Mushrooms are Gods (Part II)
Save Bigfoot
 
   
 
About

Published on Sep 26, 2010

More random information about Amanita Muscaria Formosa, aka SOMA or the Fly Argaric.

 
  Amanita Muscaria Var. Formosa.. maybe?
Jason Parent
 
   
 
About

Published on Sep 24, 2013

This video was uploaded from an Android phone.

 
  Eastern yellow fly agaric mushroom
Natasha Valcourt
   
   
 
About

Published on Oct 4, 2015

The common Amanita muscaria in the Eastern United States has a yellow, unlike the common Amanita muscaria of the West Coast that has a red cap.Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the fly agaric or fly amanita, is a mushroom and psychoactive basidiomycete fungus, one of many in the genus Amanita. Native throughout the temperate and boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere, Amanita muscaria has been unintentionally introduced to many countries in the Southern Hemisphere, generally as a symbiont with pine and birch plantations, and is now a true cosmopolitan species. It associates with various deciduous and coniferous trees.

The quintessential toadstool, it is a large white-gilled, white-spotted, usually red mushroom, one of the most recognisable and widely encountered in popular culture. Several subspecies with differing cap colour have been recognised, including the brown regalis (often considered a separate species), the yellow-orange flavivolvata, guessowii, formosa, and the pinkish persicina. Genetic studies published in 2006 and 2008 show several sharply delineated clades that may represent separate species.

Although classified as poisonous, reports of human deaths resulting from its ingestion are extremely rare. After parboiling—which weakens its toxicity and breaks down the mushroom's psychoactive substances—it is eaten in parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. Amanita muscaria is noted for its hallucinogenic properties, with its main psychoactive constituent being the compound muscimol. The mushroom was used as an intoxicant and entheogen by the peoples of Siberia, and has a religious significance in these cultures. There has been much speculation on possible traditional use of this mushroom as an intoxicant in other places such as the Middle East, Eurasia, North America, and Scandinavia.

   
       

 

Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

Report a sighting of this fungus.

 
  This button not working for you?
Simply email us at info@MinnesotaSeasons.com.
Be sure to include a location.
 
  Rebekka Erdman
9/30/2021

Location: Battle Creek Dog Park, Ramsey County MN

Some are dinner plate size here!!

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Sheri Karras
9/30/2021

Location: St. Louis County

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Luciearl
9/10/2021

Location: Cass County

So many amanitas this fall! I've seen many clusters in the woods.

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Melissa Schlickenmayer
9/23/2020

Location: Sartell, Minnesota

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  PattiOD
9/13/2020

Location: Central NH, USA

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Rachel B.
8/23/2020

Location: Barnum Minnesota 45 minutes south of Dulth

found a bunch of these was hoping they were edible but wasn't sure so didn't eat.

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Jeffrey M. Arsenault
7/14/2020

Location: Mankato

Just after a rainfall, so I believe that the “warts” were partially washed away.

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Larry Helige
10/6/2019

Location: Vancouver WA

 

 
  Carrie Olson
9/15/2019

Location: Park Rapids

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Anne Nienaber
9/7/2019

Location: Stearns County

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Walter Rudd
9/5/2019

Location: Washington County, MN near Scandia

Here are some nice specimens of the Eastern yellow/orange fly agaric mushroom I found growing in the northern part of Washington county, MN near Scandia. There were hundreds of colonies on this private 14 acre plot of land.

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
  Karen Papiernik
9/2/2019

Location: Town of Lockport, New York

 

 
  Robert Briggs
9/24/2016

Location: Lebanon Hills Regional Park

American Eastern Yellow Fly Agaric

 
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Sightings
 
   

 

 

Binoculars


Created: 11/5/2016

Last Updated:

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