great burdock

(Arctium lappa)

Conservation Status

 

No image available

  IUCN Red List

not listed

     
  NatureServe

NNA - Not applicable

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
           
           
 
Description
 
 

Great burdock is a 3 to 9 tall, but usually 5 tall or less, erect, biennial forb that rises on a single stem from a fleshy taproot. In its first year of growth this produces a rosette of basal leaves. In the second year it produces a hollow stalk that is branched, hairy, and ridged.

Basal leaves are large, heart shaped and indented at the base where they attach to long leaf stalks. They are 10 to 31 long and 8 to 27 wide. The leaf stalk is 6 to 14 long, deeply grooved, and solid. The upper surface is green with sparse short hairs. The lower surface is light green or gray-green, with a thin covering of matted, short, soft, woolly hairs. The leaf margins are wavy. By the time the flowers are fully open the basal leaves are usually withered.

Stem leaves are much smaller, alternate, and egg-shaped, getting progressively smaller toward the top of the stem. They are nearly hairless on both the upper and lower surfaces.

The inflorescence is a cluster of long-stalked flower heads, the outer ones on longer stalks, forming a flat-topped or convex cluster. The clusters appear at the end of the stem and in the upper leaf axils. They are crowded and densely packed.

Flower heads have about 40 purple florets and are on 1 to 2 long stalks. The whorl of overlapping bracts subtending the flower head is 1 to 1½ in diameter. It is hairless except for, usually, a few long, cobwebby hairs. The bracts are hooked at the tip. When dry the flower head becomes a bur resembling a thistle. Thistles, however, do not have hooked bracts.

 
     
 

Height

 
 

3 to 9, but usually 5 or less

 
     
 

Flower Color

 
 

Purple

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
 

Common burdock (Arctium minus) leaf stalks are hollow, at least at the base, and are not grooved. The flower heads are smaller, ½ to 1 in diameter, and are on short stalks or are stalkless.

Woolly burdock (Arctium tomentosum) flower heads are densely cobwebby.

 
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Disturbed sites, roadsides.

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Flowering

 
 

August to October

 
     
 
Use
 
 

 

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

2, 4, 7, 22.

 
  1/2/2014      
         
 

Nativity

 
 

Native to Asia, Europe, and the Indian subcontinent. Introduced and naturalized in the United States.

 
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Uncommon in Minnesota

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
  Kingdom Plantae (green algae and land plants)  
  Subkingdom Viridiplantae (green plants)  
  Infrakingdom Streptophyta (land plants and green algae)  
  Superdivision Embryophyta (land plants)  
  Division Tracheophyta (vascular plants)  
  Subdivision Spermatophytina (seed plants)  
  Class Magnoliopsida (flowering plants)  
  Superorder Asteranae  
 

Order

Asterales (sunflowers, bellflowers, fanflowers, and allies)  
 

Family

Asteraceae (sunflowers, daisies, asters, and allies)  
  Subfamily Carduoideae (thistles and allies)  
  Tribe Cynareae (= Cardueae)  
  Subtribe Carduinae (thistles and burdocks)  
  Genus Arctium (burdock)  
       
 

Cardueae is a synonym of the tribe name. Cynareae was published first and has precedence. Nevertheless, most sources use the name Cardueae for the tribe.

 
       
 

Subordinate Taxa

 
 

 

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Arctium chaorum

Arctium lappa ssp. majus

Arctium leiospermum

Arctium majus

Lappa major

Lappa vulgaris

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

beggar’s-button

burdock

cockle-button

cuckold

edible burrdock

giant burdock

gobo

great burdock

greater burdock

harlock

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Axil

The upper angle where the leaf stalk meets the stem.

 

Bract

Modified leaf at the base of a flower stalk, flower cluster, or inflorescence.

       
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Slideshows
   
  Arctium lappa
Matt Lavin
 
  Arctium lappa  
 
About

Introduced biennial to short-lived perennial herb that stand upwards of 1.5 m tall and with large basal leaves that can be up to 50 cm long, the flowering heads are 3-4 cm wide, have involucral bracts (phyllaries) with hooked Velcro-like tips and are arranged in open panicles.

 
     
  Greater Burdock (Arctium lappa)
Bill Keim
 
  Greater Burdock (Arctium lappa)  
     
  Arctium lappa
clara bordoy
 
   
 
About

Published on May 12, 2013

Plants of future (http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Arctium+lappa)

GRIN - Taxonomic information (http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?3857)

 
     

 

slideshow

       
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Other Videos
 
  Greater burdock (Arctium lappa) - 2013-07-22
W3stlander
 
   
 
About

Published on Aug 8, 2013

Arctium lappa, commonly called greater burdock, gobō,edible burdock, lappa, or beggar's buttons, is a biennial plant[citation needed] of the Arctium (burdock) genus in the Asteraceae family, cultivated in gardens for its root used as a vegetable. It is an invasive weed of high-nitrogen soils.

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De grote klit, ook wel grote klis genoemd (Arctium lappa) is een tweejarige plant die tot de composietenfamilie (Asteraceae) behoort.

   
       
  Greater Burdock (Arctium Lappa) - 2012-08-14
W3stlander
 
   
 
About

Published on Aug 21, 2012

Arctium lappa, commonly called greater burdock, edible burdock, lappa, or beggar's buttons, is a biennial plant of the Arctium (burdock) genus in the Asteraceae family, cultivated in gardens for its root used as a vegetable. It is an invasive weed of high-nitrogen soils.

--------------
De grote klit, ook wel grote klis genoemd (Arctium lappa) is een tweejarige plant die tot de composietenfamilie (Asteraceae) behoort.

   
       
  Wild plant food journey's #9 Burdocks. Arctium lappa / A.minor MP4
ipso phyto
 
   
 
About

Published on Oct 31, 2012

Autumn is the best time for gathering wild rots. Here, experienced forager and medicinal plantsman Christopher Hope BSc describes the very common, yet underused burdocks. A fantastic food for diabetics as it contains inulin, not starch. This plant is much used medicinally as well as an alterative. Available most everywhere and difficult not to find! For more information and foraging courses all yea round, visit www.ipsophyto.com

   
       

 

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