lilypad clubtail

(Arigomphus furcifer)

Conservation Status
lilypad clubtail
  IUCN Red List

not listed

     
  NatureServe

N5 - Secure

SNR - Unranked

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
           
 
Description
 
 

Lilypad clubtail is an early season, medium-sized, pond clubtail. It is found from Maine and Virginia to Minnesota. Its range includes most of Wisconsin but barely makes it across the border to Minnesota.

The thorax of the male is pale grayish-green with black markings including two thin upper (dorsal) stripes, a broad shoulder stripe, and a side (lateral) stripe arches around to join the middorsal stripe at the end. The female thorax is yellowish but is otherwise similar.

The abdomen is slender and black with yellow markings. The upper (dorsal) surface or abdominal segments 1 through 7 have narrow, elongated, lance-shaped spots. Segment 8 sometimes has a sort yellow streak, segment 9 is unmarked, and segment 10 is mostly yellow on top. Segments 8 and 9 also have bright orangish-brown patches on the sides. On the male the end of the abdomen is only slightly expanded into a “club” that is widest at segment 8. The claspers at the end of the abdomen point inward and are often yellow. On the female the abdomen is tapered from segment 7 to a very narrow segment 10.

The head is small. The large compound eyes are azure blue. They do not meet at the top of the head. The area behind the compound eyes at the top of the head (occiput) is straight across or only slightly convex.

The legs are black.

The wings are clear except for dark stigmas. The wing triangle, a section of intersecting veins about 20% of the way from the base to the wingtip, is about the same size in the forewing and the hindwing.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

Total Length: about 2

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
  Horned clubtail (Arigomphus cornutus) has a broader abdomen with wider dorsal spots, including a dorsal spot on segment 8. The occiput is convex and very high, especially so in the female.  
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Marshy ponds, lakes, and slow streams with submerged vegetation and brushy shores

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

Late May to early August

 
     
 

Behavior

 
 

It often perches on lilypads, hence the common name, but also on other floating vegetation, small trees, and sometimes the ground.

 
     
 

Life Cycle

 
 

After mating the females deposits eggs by flying close to the water surface and tapping the tip of her abdomen into water. After the eggs hatch the young (naiads) live in submerged vegetation. When they mature they crawl onto a lily pad or partly out of the water on a vegetative stem to emerge as adults.

 
     
 

Nymph Food

 
 

 

 
     
 

Adult Food

 
 

 

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

7, 17, 18, 29, 72.

 
  10/19/2015      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Uncommon

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
 

Order

Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies)  
 

Suborder

Epiprocta  
  Infraorder Anisoptera (dragonflies)  
 

Superfamily

Aeshnoidea  
 

Family

Gomphidae (clubtails)  
 

Genus

Arigomphus  
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Gomphus furcifer

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

lilypad clubtail

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Naiad

The aquatic larval form (nymph) of a dragonfly, mayfly, or stonefly.

 

Occiput

The back of the head. In Odonata, Megaloptera, and Neuroptera, the upper part of the head behind the eyes.

 

Stigma

In plants, the portion of the female part of the flower that is receptive to pollen. In Lepidoptera, an area of specialized scent scales on the forewing of some skippers, hairstreaks, and moths. In other insects, a thickened, dark, or opaque cell on the leading edge of the wing.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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Other Videos
 
  Arigomphus furcifer pseudopupils 21 June 2014 IMGP4900.mov
kestrelhaven
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 22, 2014

Arigomphus furcifer pseudopupils 21 June 2014 IMGP4900.mov

 
       

 

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