simple wave

(Scopula junctaria)

simple wave
Photo by Lynn Rubey
  Hodges #

7164

 
 
Conservation Status
  IUCN Red List

not listed

     
  NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
 
Description
 
 

With about 500 described species worldwide, Scopula is the largest genus in the subfamily Sterrhinae (waves and mochas). At least 30 occur in North America north of Mexico. The genus also contains some of the largest and most common species of the family Sterrhinae in North America.

Simple wave is a small geometer moth. It occurs across the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Adults have a wingspan of ¾ to 1 (20 to 26 mm). They are variable in both the shape of the forewings and its overall color. The forewings may be sharply angled or rounded at the tip. The overall color may be white or dingy yellowish (cream-colored). All individuals have a dusting of dark scales on the forewings and hindwings. There are at least three dark, thin, wavy lines: the antemedial line (AM line), between the basal and median areas; the median line, which passes through the median area; and the postmedial line (PM line), that separates the median area from the postmedial area. On cream-colored individuals, there is also visible an adterminal line, just before the terminal area; and a subterminal line (ST line), between the PM line and the adterminal line. Lines on cream-colored individuals are brownish-yellow and easily discernible. Lines on white individuals are faint. The AM, median, and PM lines are sightly sinuous, are complete from the inner to the forward (costal) margins, and curve up approaching the costal margin. On white individuals the ST and adterminal lines are present but may be difficult to see. There is usually no discal spot. The hindwing is similar but there is no AM line.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

Wingspan: ¾ to 1 (20 to 26 mm)

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
     
     
 
Habitat
 
 

 

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

One generation per year: Late May to August

 
     
 

Behavior

 
 

The wings are spread out and appressed to the leaf or other substrate when at rest. In this position, the leading edges of the wings (costas) form a nearly straight line.

 
     
 

Life Cycle

 
 

 

 
     
 

Larva Hosts

 
 

Leaves of forbs and deciduous trees and shrubs, including chickweed, elm, and clover

 
     
 

Adult Food

 
 

 

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

21, 24, 29, 30, 71, 72, 75.

 
  12/8/2019      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

 

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
 

Order

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)  
 

Suborder

Glossata  
 

Infraorder

Neolepidoptera  
  Parvorder Heteroneura  
  No Rank Ditrysia  
  No Rank Obtectomera  
 

Superfamily

Geometroidea (geometrid and swallowtail moths)  
 

Family

Geometridae (geometer moths)  
 

Subfamily

Sterrhinae (waves and mochas)  
 

Tribe

Scopulini  
 

Genus

Scopula  
       
 

Subordinate Taxa

 
 

simple wave (Scopula junctaria johnstonaria)

simple wave (Scopula junctaria junctaria)

simple wave (Scopula junctaria quinquelinearia)

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

 

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

simple wave

simple wave moth

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Antemedial line

A thin line separating the basal area and the median area of the forewing of Lepidoptera.

 

Costal margin

The leading edge of the forewing of insects.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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Lynn Rubey

 
  A Simple Wave Moth in The Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge.   simple wave  
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
 

 

 
           
           

 

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Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

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  Lynn Rubey
8/13/2019

Location: Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

A Simple Wave Moth in The Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge.

simple wave  
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Sightings
 
 

 

 

 

 

Binoculars


Created: 8/27/2019

Last Updated:

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