mountain death camas

(Anticlea elegans)

Overview
mountain death camas
Photo by Bill Reynolds
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     
           
 
Description
 
 

 

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 24, 28.

 
  4/24/2021      
         
 
Taxonomy
 
  Kingdom Plantae (green algae and land plants)  
  Subkingdom Viridiplantae (green plants)  
  Infrakingdom Streptophyta (land plants and green algae)  
  Superdivision Embryophyta (land plants)  
  Division Tracheophyta (vascular plants)  
  Subdivision Spermatophytina (seed plants)  
  Class Liliopsida (monocots)  
 

Order

Liliales (lilies, supplejacks, and allies)  
 

Family

Melanthiaceae (bunchflowers)  
  Tribe Melanthieae  
 

Genus

Anticlea (death camas)  
       
 

Mountain death camas was formerly included in the genus Zigadenus. However, that species was broadly defined and lacked very distinctive morphological features. In the nineteenth century (Kunth, 1843) separated it into the genus Anticlea, but this was not widely accepted. Molecular phylogenetic studies in 2001 confirmed its placement with ten other species in the genus Anticlea. USDA PLANTS, Flora of North America, and NatureServe Explorer continue to use the old name Zigadenus elegans. Virtually all other authoritative sources use the new name.

 
       
 

Subordinate Taxa

 
 

mountain death camas (Anticlea elegans var. elegans)

white camas (Anticlea elegans ssp. glauca)

 
       
 

Most sources recognize two subspecies or varieties of mountain death camas. The western subspecies, ssp. elegans, is smaller; the leaves and stems are usually not glaucous; and the inflorescence is usually unbranched, sometimes one- or two-branched. The eastern subspecies, ssp. glaucus, is larger; the leaves and stems are glaucous; and the inflorescence is branched. The ranges of the two subspecies overlap in Minnesota and the Dakotas. There is much intergradation of features throughout the area of overlap.

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Zigadenus elegans

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

death camas

mountain death camas

mountain deathcamas

white camas

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
Visitor Photos
 
           
 

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Greg Watson

 
  I asked Minnesota Wildflowers, https://www.minnesotawildflowers for verification and they agreed it was Mountain Death Camus. They noted that they had never seen it growing on the side of a bluff like that.   mountain death camas  
           
        mountain death camas  
 

Bill Reynolds

 
  According to Dr Marla Spivak, this a poisonous plant for Honey Bees   mountain death camas  
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
    mountain death camas   mountain death camas  
           

 

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Slideshows
 
Zigadenus elegans
Matt Lavin
  Zigadenus elegans  
     

 

slideshow

       
 
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Other Videos
 
  Mountain Death Camas - Anticlea elegans
Biophilia
 
   
 
About

Published on Apr 15, 2014

Mountain Deathcamas (Anticlea elegans, formerly Zigadenus elegans) is also known as Elegant Camas or "alkali grass". It is not a grass (though its leaves are grass-like), but belongs to the trillium family, Melanthiaceae.

It has white lily-like flowers and two-pronged, greenish-yellow glands on each petal (the shape of which can help in distinguishing it from other members of the genus). It is widely distributed throughout North America and occurs in many habitats. Plants on the western side of the continent tend to be smaller in size than their eastern counterparts, but have more densely clustered flowers. The flower is extremely poisonous.

More information at: http://www.untamedscience.com/biodiversity/mountain-death-camas/

 
  Death Camas and Wild Onion
LM Publications
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jun 8, 2010

DEATH CAMAS — In the Lily family and is a fatally poisonous plant which can be mistaken for the Wild Onion because of the bulb-like root and the onion-like leaves coming from the base. It is wise to collect these bulb plants only when in bloom for accurate identification. The yellowish flowers grow on stalks crowded together. All parts are toxic. Poisoning Symptoms: Nausea and severe vomiting, diarrhea, mus-cular weakness, a slowing of the pulse and low blood pressure.Treatment: Induce vomiting, followed by a strong laxative.

 
       

 

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Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

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  Greg Watson
5/24/2021

Location: Stoney Point located within Vetsch Park in La Crescent, MN

I asked Minnesota Wildflowers, https://www.minnesotawildflowers for verification and they agreed it was Mountain Death Camus. They noted that they had never seen it growing on the side of a bluff like that.

mountain death camas

 
 

Cory Netland
5/24/2021

Location: Grace Marshes WMA (Lund Prairie)

Just south of State Highway 40

 

 
  Bill Reynolds
7/11/2014

Location: Numedal Township, Pennington Co., Minnesota

According to Dr Marla Spivak, this a poisonous plant for Honey Bees

mountain death camas

 
           
 
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