one-eyed sphinx

(Smerinthus cerisyi)

one-eyed sphinx
Photo by Bill Reynolds
  Hodges #

7822

 
 
Conservation Status
  IUCN Red List

not listed

     
  NatureServe

N4N5 - Apparently Secure to Secure

SNR - Unranked

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
 
Description
 
 

One-eyed sphinx is a large, nocturnal sphinx moth. It has a wingspan of 27 16 to 39 16.

The outer margin of the forewing may be irregularly scalloped or almost smooth and has a blunt “tooth” at the anal angle. The upper side may be gray or tan with irregular banding. There is a broad blackish median band and a broad dark terminal band.

The upper side of the hindwing is bright rosy pink near the base fading abruptly to tan near the margin. There is a large black eyespot near the inner margin with an incomplete bright blue circle in the center. There is sometimes a blue crescent at the top of the black eyespot.

The thorax has a black dorsal patch. The appendage (tegula) covering the forewing base is pale gray. The abdomen is gray with a dark dorsal stripe.

The caterpillar is up to 2 long and variable in color. It may be green, bluish-green, or yellowish-green. The head, thorax, and abdomen are moderately covered with prominent, minute, white bumps. The head is broadly triangular, flattened, and framed with a wide pale cream or yellow stripe. A long curved horn extends from the eighth abdominal segment. It may be yellow, pink, and/or blue. There is a pale cream to yellow subdorsal stripe that extends from the first thoracic segment to the seventh abdominal segment; and a bold whitish diagonal line that extends from the horn to just above the leg-like structure (proleg) on the sixth abdominal segment. Abdominal segments 1 through 6 each have a lateral, yellowish, diagonal line and a faint red circle surrounding the white respiratory opening (spiracle).

Mature caterpillars can be found from July through September.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

Wingspan: 27 16 to 39 16

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
     
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Valleys, streamsides

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

One brood: mid-May to early July

 
     
 

Behavior

 
 

When perched, the wings are held elevated, slightly away from the body, and parallel to the resting surface. Males arch their abdomen upwards when at rest. Females do not.

Adults fly at night and are attracted to light.

 
     
 

Life Cycle

 
 

Females attract males by releasing pheromones. After mating, she lays spherical green eggs singly or in pairs on the underside of host plant leaves. The eggs hatch in 6 to 8 days and the caterpillars begin feeding on leaves and fruit of the host plant.

 
     
 

Larva Hosts

 
 

Mostly poplar (Populus) and willow (Salix).

 
     
 

Adult Food

 
 

Adults do not feed.

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

7, 21, 24, 29, 75.

 
  9/27/2015      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Common

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
 

Order

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)  
 

Suborder

Glossata  
 

Infraorder

Neolepidoptera  
  Parvorder Heteroneura  
  No Rank Ditrysia  
  No Rank Obtectomera  
 

Superfamily

Bombycoidea (hawk-moths)  
 

Family

Sphingidae (hawk moths, sphinx moths, and hornworms)  
 

Subfamily

Sphinginae (small-eyed sphinx moth)  
 

Tribe

Smerinthini  
 

Genus

Smerinthus  
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

 

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

cerisy’s sphinx moth

one-eyed sphinx

willow sphinx

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Anal angle

The angle at the corner formed where the outer and inner margins meet.

 

Proleg

A fleshy structure on the abdomen of some insect larvae that functions as a leg, but lacks the five segments of a true insect leg.

 

Spiracle

A small opening on the surface of an insect through which the insect breathes.

 

Tegula

A small, hardened plate or flap-like structure that overlaps the base of the forewing of insects in the orders Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Diptera, and Homoptera.

 
 
Visitor Photos
 
           
 

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Bill Reynolds

 
    one-eyed sphinx      
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
 

 

 
           
           

 

Camera

     
 
Slideshows
 
One-eyed Sphinx Moth
Andree Reno Sanborn
  One-eyed Sphinx Moth  
 
About

Smerinthus cerisyi

larva:

bugguide.net/node/view/37402/bgimage

 
One-eyed Sphinx - Hodges#7822 (Smerinthus cerisyi)
Andree Reno Sanborn
  One-eyed Sphinx - Hodges#7822 (Smerinthus cerisyi)  
     

 

slideshow

       
 
Visitor Videos
 
       
 

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Other Videos
 
  The One-Eyed Sphinx
OmegaMolecule
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 9, 2007

A quick video of Smerinthus cerisyi or the one-eyed sphinx moth.Every year one of these moths shows up on my porch, I usually am not into entomology but this creature is so beautiful and one of the larger insect's here.

 
  Cerisy's Sphinx Moth
wetvideocamera
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 4, 2011

Cerisy's Sphinx moth observed near Lumby, BC

( Smerinthus cerisyi ) May 2007

 
       

 

Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

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  Karen Girard
5/23/2016

Location: Big Lake (Sherburne County)

   
  Bill Reynolds
10/13/2013

Location: Pennington Co.

one-eyed sphinx  
           
 
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